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Jeremy Deller

Art at Its Best 2013: A Top Ten List

by Corinna Kirsch on December 23, 2013
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I’ve never been able to come up with a top ten list of exhibitions; big, lasting ideas don’t always take place in art on the wall. So, keep that in mind with my best-of list; there’re exhibitions, sure, but my main requirement was picking “art” that I keep coming back to time-and-time again.

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A Strange, Spiritual Turn at the 55th Venice Biennale

by Corinna Kirsch on June 7, 2013
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I have lukewarm feelings on this year’s Venice Biennale, which contains two distinct exhibitions: The Encyclopedic Palace, a 1,000-artwork-plus exhibition curated by Massimiliano Gioni, and dozens of national, pavilion-based exhibitions organized by curators from each country. Despite the slightly confusing fact that the theme of the Biennale as a whole is The Encyclopedic Palace, historically, the two exhibitions don’t have much overlap. But something different happened this year.

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The 55th Venice Biennale: Giardini Slideshow With Commentary

by Paddy Johnson and Corinna Kirsch on June 3, 2013
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Last week we spent hundreds of hours looking at art at the Venice Biennale. We saw a lot of art. It’s a sprawling affair, that invites hundreds of countries to exhibit their nation’s best artwork.

We have a lot to talk about, so without any further ado, here’s part one of our Giardini slideshow with commentary. It features pavilions by Russia, Great Britain, Switzerland, Venezuela, Greece, Poland, Serbia, Japan, South Korea, Germany, the United States, and Canada. Look for part two later today.

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Friday Links: Deller Censorship and Pritzker Shame

by Whitney Kimball on May 31, 2013

A rare hen harrier. Image courtesy of the Guardian.

  • If you have yet to catch up on the Pritzker Prize controversy, Carolina Miranda’s recent analysis is the authoritative source. As for why you should care, her April interview with Denise Scott Brown offered a pretty shocking testimony to misogyny in the architecture world. [Architect Magazine]
  • Roberta Smith was a friend of Donald Judd, and likes his shrine-house, which has been restored just as he left it. “Its inauguration can only be good for art, design and architecture in New York City and elsewhere,” she writes. [NY Times] (If you still have yet to read Jerry Saltz’s conversation with architecture critic Justin Davidson on the subject, that’s a good one. It reaffirms why people feel so strongly about Judd, and why the Judd worship is justified). [NY Mag]
  • Pinterest has announced it’s loosening up on the nudity ban to accommodate artful nudes. Not that it ever had much luck policing those. [TechCrunch]
  • A new service called Coub (ew) allows you to create ten-second loops from YouTube videos. [Animal, coub]
  • We really can all get along. The Wall Street Journal observes that local businesses are catering more to the art residents in Bushwick. The Boar’s Head distributor Frank Brunckhorst Co. has offered the use of its private block to Storefront Bushwick so they can curate a sculpture show in the street this weekend. [WSJ (behind the paywall)]
  • Apparently, the British Council asked Venice Biennale artist Jeremy Deller not to show a banner ambiguously stating “Prince Harry Kills Me.” They worried that it referenced British troops in Afghanistan; Deller confirmed to BBC Radio that it also had to do with the Sandringham incident, in which the prince and a friend were investigated for the shooting of two rare birds of prey on his family’s estate. (His show is full of bird imagery). [Guardian]
  • Once there was an easy way to get from Brooklyn to Queens without going through Manhattan. But that’s just not possible anymore. [Village Voice]
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Thursday Links: The Venice Round-Up

by Whitney Kimball and Will Brand on May 30, 2013
  • For $2000/night, you can sleep over in Judd’s five-story Soho loft, immersing yourself more deeply in art than ever before. [Curbed] UPDATE: Just kidding. [Gallerist]
  • Following yesterday’s takedown of bikes, and sharing, the Observer kicks off its new column “Isn’t That Rich?,”  a column on uptown social life. This week’s edition: chauffeur-nannies, authored by Mr. Burns: “The New York Post recently wrote about parents who were passing off their classroom volunteer duties onto nannies, much to the dismay of their private schools, or rather, of the other moms, who didn’t fancy selling snickerdoodles alongside hired help at bake sales.” Seriously, this is the best thing I’ve read all week. [Observer]
  • We don’t know how we failed to link this yet, but William Powhida’s new show does a solid job of mocking “conceptually-based” market-tailored art strategies. Between the shipping crate, the neon, the digital color field, he’s basically got the Frieze bases covered. The show’s in LA, but the PDF says it all. [MAN, williampowhida]
  • Kriston Capps at Washington City Paper has an enjoyably thorough report on Hirshhorn Director Richard Koshalek’s resignation. The bigger question: is Washington willing to support large-scale, unabashedly contemporary projects on the National Mall? [City Paper]
  • In disputes over fair wages, British museum workers stage walkouts from the National Gallery, Tate Liverpool, Stonehenge, and several more. [BBC]
  • Carol Vogel’s profile on Massimiliano Gioni tells us little about the Biennale, but once again confirms that, yes, one truly can have it all. [NY Times]
  • The show is based on the “Encyclopedic Palace,” a Futurist model of a 136 foot-tall skyscraper intended to contain all of the knowledge of the world. It reflects the scope of the art world. Gioni “hop[es] every artist in the show comes across as an outsider.” [Sotheby's]
  • HuffPo describes Ai Weiwei’s “Sacred”, a solo show collateral to the Biennale, and its six dioramas of his treatment in prison, and perfect reconstructions of his cell.  He’s also showing “Straight,” 150 tons of straightened rebar scrounged from the ruins of Chinese schools which collapsed in the 2008 Sichuan earthquake and killed over 5,000 children. [HuffPo]
  • Nationalgalerie Curator Udo Kittelmann isn’t happy with the choice, feeling that Ai Weiwei will overshadow the others. [TAN]
  • Charlotte Higgins observes that Weiwei’s dioramas in coffin-like black boxes, in a church, draw comparisons to self-martyrdom. Curators rush to his defense. [Guardian]
  • The Brits (at least one of them) take more of a shine to Jeremy Deller’s very British pavilion. [Guardian]
  • Twitter’s raving about Sarah Sze’s pavilion, which looks from here like blurry sticks. You just gotta be there. [museumnerd, Daily Beast]
  • Otto Muehl has died. [NY Times]
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English Magic: Jeremy Deller at the British Pavilion

by Corinna Kirsch on May 30, 2013
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Jeremy Deller’s video “English Magic” dabbles in extreme self-interest.

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After UC Davis, We Need Art: Jeremy Deller’s Battle of Orgreave

by Will Brand on December 2, 2011
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“Uselessness” is a pretty good way to identify something as art. Hennessy Youngman said that as a joke – “I can’t possibly sit on all these chairs! ART. “- but it’s true; when in doubt, use value is the division between art and design, video and documentary. Bringing that division into question can create some incredible artworks.

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