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The L Magazine

Art F City at The L Magazine: Paddy Doesn’t Work Here Anymore

by Paddy Johnson on February 26, 2014
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I filed my last column for the L Magazine today. It’s been a good seven years with them so I’m bummed to leave. But, you know, new horizons and all that. In two weeks you can read my bimonthly column on artnet News.

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Almost Human: Richard Serra

by Paddy Johnson on January 29, 2014
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I search for a scrap of humanity in Richard Serra’s steel, which has been crane-lifted into the Gagosian empire

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Predictions for the New Year

by Paddy Johnson on January 15, 2014
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What’s the new year without a few predictions? I got mine in at The L Magazine and there’s plenty to talk about. Will the Armory Show be relevant this year? Who are we going to talk about at the Whitney Biennial, and of course, what animal will have dominance amongst art makers this year?

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In 2014, Let’s Find Solutions, Not Just Problems

by Paddy Johnson on January 2, 2014
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Two days before Christmas I received a note from a colleague. He felt that much of the art getting made today is devoid of presence—that it’s self-serving, ego-tripping, and fails to contribute to contemporary culture. I couldn’t disagree, but there is a solution.

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Digital Art’s First Auction

by Paddy Johnson on October 23, 2013
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This week at The L Magazine, I talk to Phillips auction attendees and market experts to try and gage the success of the first digital art auction, Paddles On. Based on what I heard, I’d guardedly call it a success.

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Christie’s Should Know The Difference Between New Media and Digital Art

by Paddy Johnson on September 25, 2013
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This week at The L Magazine, I rant about Christie’s online-only auction, “First Open: New Media”. With a bit of smart marketing, this company could actively be working to expand a digital market. Instead, they’re producing bullshit copy and lazy auctions.

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8 Museum Shows You Need to See This Fall

by Paddy Johnson on August 28, 2013
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This week at The L Magazine Paul D’Agostino and I calibrated our crystal balls for the fall, and came up with eight museum shows we’re sure are gonna be worth a view or two. Mike Kelley’s been a theme today, so I’m including our blurb for his retrospective at MoMA PS1 below.

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Art F City at The L Magazine: Biennial Fail

by Paddy Johnson on July 31, 2013
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What does a biennale look like when it’s run by a group of businessmen and politicians? If Denver’s Biennial of the Americas (July 16-September 2) is any indication, like some awful, biennale-length franken-conference in the service of multinational corporations. Art, when it was given a place at all, was used primarily as a branding tool for the event; it’s not surprising then that it has little to offer art lovers or businesspeople. Even the Biennial’s expressed aims—idea exchange, and looking to booming economies in the north and south—weren’t achieved.

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Art F City at The L Magazine: 7 Tips for MFA Graduate Job Seekers

by Paddy Johnson on July 18, 2013
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This week at The L Magazine, I give advice to MFA grads on finding a job.

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Art F City at The L Magazine: Bogus Journeys

by Paddy Johnson on June 19, 2013
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This week at The L Magazine I forever debunk the idea that travel for the arts is at all glamorous.

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